The GoPro’s unique size has led to a seemingly endless number of variations in which to mount and use a GoPro. If you are just starting out with a GoPro and rummaging through all the different mounts the camera comes without the box, or searching for aftermarket mounting options, it can leave you feeling a bit overwhelmed. To make things a bit easier for you, here are three of the most useful mounting options for your GoPro cameras.

GoPoleSnorkeler with GoProThis has become one of the most widely used mounting options for the GoPro. The basic idea is that by putting the camera at the end of a telescoping stick, the user can then get the camera closer to their intended subject without physically getting closer. I’ll be honest, this is not my favorite mounting option, as having the GoPro at the end of a four-foot pole doesn’t allow the user to access the camera’s buttons easily. Along with that, with the camera at the end of a stick, it doesn’t offer much in the way of stability or composition. Most people come back with very wobbly shots with the subject passing in and out of the camera’s field of view. However, if you are unable to duck dive down a few feet but still want to get close-up shots of the fish and reef that aren’t from six-feet away, then this method of mounting a GoPro would be a good option for you.

Floating Single Hand Gripfloating gopro handleThis is very similar to the GoPole style, however, as the significantly shorter grip allows the user to easily reach the different buttons on the camera, while also offering much more in the way of camera stability and more accurate composition. Another benefit a lot of these aftermarket grips offer is that they float, even with the camera attached. If you accidentally drop the camera there’s a good chance you’ll be able to find it floating on the surface. This is a good option for those who are able to duck-dive down to the reef.

Dual Handled Tray

GoPro with dual handle tray and lights

This is by far my most preferred mount for GoPro cameras as the dual handles allow for maximum camera stability while also being able to easily reach the buttons. This is the way professional camera operators mount their cameras, and it’s a great option for those that want to really get into underwater film and photography. Another benefit of the dual handled tray is that most brands will include the ball mounts at the end of the handles where you can attach video lights.

About Author

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Alex Lindbloom
Alex is a Snorkel Venture and Dive Safari Asia guide as well as one of the video and photo pros for both companies. Alex is also a field editor for a popular underwater photography magazine. Prior to joining Snorkel Venture in 2018 Alex lived and worked all over the world as an underwater cameraman, including five years on a boat in Indonesia. Alex's images and videos have garnered many international awards such as Underwater Photographer of the Year, and can be seen on NatGeo, Discovery Channel, the UN Building, and various magazines.